Tag Archive for tea notes

Chinese Tea tasting…first cab off the ranks..

Chinese Tea tasting…first cab off the ranks..

…is a 2013 Yunnan Hong Mao Jian..

a Chinese red tea (what we would usually call black but i s’pose you can see it in the leaf and brew i reckon..

an April (spring) harvest red tea from the Fengqing area of Lincang, Yunnan, China

enjoy….!

have a sniff around or head to the shop !

for more information on teas, preparation, prices etc

contact stu- theteacatcher@gmail.com

keemun time

keemun time

next up a 2013 keemun-

a Chinese tea classic…a quite broken dark leaf, deep and warm in tone, fresh taste and clean finish…hmmm

(hey fine folk @ThreeDRadio listeners down south, send me yr deets, i will send of a sample and you can tell me if it’s up to chop…..?)

2013 Keemun sample

2013 Keemun sample


anyway, that’s said so off to the 6th? steep of 2013 yunnan yue guang bai (moonlight) tea ..it’s not white not oolong..each pour a little change in tone and taste….small pots, many cups…(and only about 15 more samples to try yet…tough job this tea catching…!)

enjoy….!

have a sniff around or head to the shop !

for more information on teas, preparation, prices etc

contact stu- theteacatcher@gmail.com

night cap- head down, bum up

night cap- head down, bum up

and finally as a nightcap i couldn’t resist sticking this little fellas nose in a cup…

2012 spring anxi light roast “yan cha” oolong…yum yum yum…

i will be getting more of this to share…yep, that good i reckon..

how many more pots before sleep i wonder….?

…(sleep?)

head down bum up anxi

head down bum up anxi

enjoy….!

have a sniff around or head to the shop !

for more information on teas, preparation, prices etc

contact stu- theteacatcher@gmail.com

as the sun sets over the Norfolk pines and the beach…

as the sun sets over the Norfolk pines and the beach…

…the regime begins again….2013 Bai Mu Dan “white peony” white tea from the Fujian province, China

the next step with this one is to line it up against the beautiful Nepali Arya Tara silver needles currently in the shop-

should be interesting..maybe a Yunnan green tea for me next though..have a fine weekend all..

got a tea table…and more late night oolong

got a tea table…and more late night oolong

with new a new tea table plumbed up water was tossed around again and again…fun

So begin your own tea experiments and enter the wonderful world of taste, experience and learning…!

buy now at the shop…!

New to The Tea Catcher Quiver

New to The Tea Catcher Quiver

“A man without tea in him is incapable of understanding truth and beauty.”

Okakura Kakuzo, The Book of Tea (1906)

Gaiwan and tasting cup

Tasting cup and Gaiwan

One of a new pair of Japanese Gaiwan; great for making Green, White and Oolong Teas.

for more information on teas, preparation, prices etc

contact stutheteacatcher@gmail.com

or head to the shop !

Afternoon Tea

Afternoon Tea

genie pot

“…meanwhile let us have a cup of tea. The afternoon glow is brightening the bamboos, the fountains are bubbling with delight, the soughing(sighing?) of the pines is heard in our kettle. Let us dream of evanescence and linger in the beautiful foolishness of things.” Kakuzo Okakura, The Book of Tea,[wiki]1906

for more information on teas, preparation, prices etc

contact stu- theteacatcher@gmail.com

or head to the shop !

Tea Labeling Nomenclature

Tea Labeling Nomenclature

tea leaves 1

SFTGFOP

S-super
SFTGFOP(1)—sometimes used to indicate the very finest

F-finest
Finest TGF OP—highest quality grade (Note: “Special” is occasionally substituted for “Finest”, with a number 1 at the end to indicate the very finest), often hand processed and produced at only the best plantations, roughly one quarter tips.

T-tippy
Tippy Golden F OP—the highest proportion of tip, main grade in Darjeeling and Assam

G-golden

F-flowery
Golden Flowery: includes very young tips or buds (usually golden in colour) that were picked early in the season.

O-orange

• Color: The copper color of a high-quality, oxidized leaf before drying, or the final bright orange color of the dried pekoes in the finished tea may be related to the name. These usually consist of one leaf bud and two leaves covered in fine, downy hair. The orange color is produced when the tea is fully oxidized.)
• (The Dutch House of Orange-Nassau, now the royal family, was already the most respected aristocratic family in the days of the Dutch Republic, and came to control the de facto head of state position of Stadtholder of Holland and Zealand. The Dutch East India Company performed a central role in bringing tea to Europe and may have marketed the tea as “orange” to suggest association with the House of Orange.)

P-pekoe
(The origin of the word “pekoe” is uncertain. One explanation is it is derived from the transliterated mispronunciation of the Amoy (Xiamen) dialect word for a Chinese tea known as “white down/hair” (白毫; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: pe̍h-ho). This is how “pekoe” is listed by Rev. Robert Morrison (1782–1834) in his Chinese dictionary (1819) as one of the seven sorts of black tea “commonly known by Europeans”. This refers to the down-like white “hairs” on the leaf and also to the youngest leaf buds. Another hypothesis is that the term derives from the Chinese báihuā “white flower” (Chinese: 白花; pinyin: báihuā; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: pe̍h-hoe), and refers to the bud content of pekoe tea.)

for more information on teas, preparation, prices etc

contact stu- theteacatcher@gmail.com

or head to the shop !

Recent Entries »